Short Story Month is nearing its end, but we can’t let it go without mentioning these inspiring collections. Read them in gulps or all at once. 

MR. BONES by Paul Theroux (forthcoming, fall 2014): A dark and bitingly humorous collection of short stories from the “brilliantly evocative” Paul Theroux (Time)

HAPPINESS, LIKE WATER by Chinelo Okparanta: A moving debut story collection centered on Nigerian women, as they build lives out of longing and hope, faith and doubt, the struggle to stay and the mandate to leave, and the burden and strength of love. 

SHOUT HER LOVELY NAME by Natalie Serber: A collection of stories about the complicated and powerful ties between mothers and daughters. 

DIVING BELLES by Lucy Wood: This whimsical and spellbinding debut collection of stories creates fresh and contemporary tales of how magic and myth work in our everyday lives, as it mines the rich folklore and history of Cornwall.

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF KATHERINE ANNE PORTER: This volume includes the collections Flowering Judas; Pale Horse, Pale Rider; and The Leaning Tower as well as four stories not available elsewhere in book form. Winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize.

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF EUDORA WELTY: This complete collection includes all the published stories of Eudora Welty with a preface written by the author especially for this edition.

BETWEEN FRIENDS by Amos Oz: In Between Friends, Amos Oz returns to the kibbutz of the late 1950s, the time and place where his writing began. 

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 2013 edited by Elizabeth StroutThe Best American Short Stories is the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction, guest edited by Pultizer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout.

Much to celebrate on Eudora Welty’s birthday. 

(Source: hmhbooks.com)

“I cannot remember a time when I was not in love with them—with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself.” 
Happy Birthday to Eudora Welty, born on this day in 1909

“I cannot remember a time when I was not in love with them—with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself.” 

Happy Birthday to Eudora Welty, born on this day in 1909

Summer means lots of traveling, and we’ve got just the book to facilitate an enlightening journey up for grabs in this week’s Win-a-Book Wednesday sweepstakes. Paul Theroux celebrates fifty years of wandering the globe by collecting  the best writing on travel from the books that shaped him, as a reader  and a traveler, with words of wisdom from authors, celebrities and famous tumbleweeds added to the mix.
Enter now for your chance to win a copy of The Tao of Travel HERE!
Part philosophical guide, part miscellany, part  reminiscence, The Tao of Travel: Enlightenments from Life on the Road enumerates “The Contents of  Some Travelers’ Bags” and exposes “Writers Who Wrote about Places They  Never Visited”; tracks extreme journeys in “Travel as an Ordeal” and  highlights some of “Travelers’ Favorite Places.” Excerpts from the best  of Theroux’s own work are interspersed with selections from travelers  both familiar and unexpected: 
Vladimir Nabokov           J.R.R. Tolkien Samuel Johnson               Eudora WeltyEvelyn Waugh                  Isak Dinesen Charles Dickens               James Baldwin Henry David Thoreau       Pico Iyer Mark Twain                     Anton Chekhov Bruce Chatwin                  John McPheeFreya Stark                      Peter Matthiessen Graham Greene                Ernest Hemingway The Tao of Travel is a unique tribute to the pleasures and pains of travel in its golden age.
Congratulations to Kate from New Jersey, winner of last week’s giveaway My Misadventures As a Teenage Rock Star.

Summer means lots of traveling, and we’ve got just the book to facilitate an enlightening journey up for grabs in this week’s Win-a-Book Wednesday sweepstakes. Paul Theroux celebrates fifty years of wandering the globe by collecting the best writing on travel from the books that shaped him, as a reader and a traveler, with words of wisdom from authors, celebrities and famous tumbleweeds added to the mix.

Enter now for your chance to win a copy of The Tao of Travel HERE!

Part philosophical guide, part miscellany, part reminiscence, The Tao of Travel: Enlightenments from Life on the Road enumerates “The Contents of Some Travelers’ Bags” and exposes “Writers Who Wrote about Places They Never Visited”; tracks extreme journeys in “Travel as an Ordeal” and highlights some of “Travelers’ Favorite Places.” Excerpts from the best of Theroux’s own work are interspersed with selections from travelers both familiar and unexpected: 


Vladimir Nabokov           J.R.R. Tolkien 
Samuel Johnson               Eudora Welty
Evelyn Waugh                  Isak Dinesen 
Charles Dickens               James Baldwin 
Henry David Thoreau       Pico Iyer 
Mark Twain                     Anton Chekhov 
Bruce Chatwin                  John McPhee
Freya Stark                      Peter Matthiessen 
Graham Greene                Ernest Hemingway

 The Tao of Travel is a unique tribute to the pleasures and pains of travel in its golden age.

Congratulations to Kate from New Jersey, winner of last week’s giveaway My Misadventures As a Teenage Rock Star.

Our Spring 2-works titles are here! Check out these two-novels-in-one combos by beloved authors with evocative covers designed by Ray Fenwick.

Willa Cather: My Antonia/O Pioneers!

First published in 1918, My Ántonia is the unforgettable story of an immigrant woman’s life on the hardscrabble Nebraska plains. Together here with O Pioneers!, a classic American tale of pioneer life and the transformation of the frontier, this volume of Willa Cather’s works captures a time, a place, and a spirit that are part of our national heritage.

Jose Saramago: Blindness/Seeing

In Blindness, a city is overcome by an epidemic of blindness that spares only one woman. She becomes a guide for a group of seven strangers and serves as the eyes and ears for the reader in this profound parable of loss and disorientation. We return to the city years later in Saramago’s Seeing, a satirical commentary on government in general and democracy in particular. Together here for the first time, this beautiful edition will be a welcome addition to the library of any Saramago fan.

Alice Walker: The Color Purple/The Temple of My Familiar

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, The Color Purple is the moving story of a young woman’s endurance of shame and suffering to become whole and to know God. The novel became an instant classic and has been adapted into a film and musical. Paired here with The Temple of My Familiar, which the author describes as “a romance of the last 500,000 years,” this edition brings together two works that established Walker as a major voice in modern fiction.

Eudora Welty: Delta Wedding/The Ponder Heart

Set in 1923, Delta Wedding is an exquisitely woven story of southern family life, centered around the Fairchild family’s preparations for a wedding at their Mississippi plantation. In The Ponder Heart, a comic masterpiece, Miss Edna Earle Ponder, one of the few living members of a once prominent family, tells a traveling salesman the history of her family and fellow townsfolk. This edition brings together two fine works from one of the most beloved writers of the American south.

New today, a collection of letters from two of the most important American writers of the 20th century - What There Is to Say We Have Said: The Correspondence of Eudora Welty and William Maxwell, edited by Suzanne  Marrs. 
For  over fifty years, Eudora Welty and William Maxwell, two of our most  admired writers, penned letters to each other. They shared their worries  about work and family, literary opinions and scuttlebutt, moments of  despair and hilarity. Living half a continent apart, their friendship  was nourished and maintained by their correspondence. What There Is to Say We Have Said bears witness to Welty and Maxwell’s editorial relationships—both in  his capacity as New Yorker editor and in their collegial back-andforth  on their work. It’s also a chronicle of the literary world of the time;  read talk of James Thurber, William Shawn, Katherine Anne Porter, J. D.  Salinger, Isak Dinesen, William Faulkner, John Updike, Virginia Woolf,  Walker Percy, Ford Madox Ford, John Cheever, and many more. It is a  treasure trove of reading recommendations. Here, Suzanne  Marrs—Welty’s biographer and friend—offers an unprecedented window into  two intertwined lives. Through careful collection of more than 300  letters as well as her own insightful introductions, she has created a  record of a remarkable friendship and a lyrical homage to the forgotten  art of letter writing.

New today, a collection of letters from two of the most important American writers of the 20th century - What There Is to Say We Have SaidThe Correspondence of Eudora Welty and William Maxwell, edited by Suzanne Marrs. 

For over fifty years, Eudora Welty and William Maxwell, two of our most admired writers, penned letters to each other. They shared their worries about work and family, literary opinions and scuttlebutt, moments of despair and hilarity. Living half a continent apart, their friendship was nourished and maintained by their correspondence. 

What There Is to Say We Have Said bears witness to Welty and Maxwell’s editorial relationships—both in his capacity as New Yorker editor and in their collegial back-andforth on their work. It’s also a chronicle of the literary world of the time; read talk of James Thurber, William Shawn, Katherine Anne Porter, J. D. Salinger, Isak Dinesen, William Faulkner, John Updike, Virginia Woolf, Walker Percy, Ford Madox Ford, John Cheever, and many more. It is a treasure trove of reading recommendations. 

Here, Suzanne Marrs—Welty’s biographer and friend—offers an unprecedented window into two intertwined lives. Through careful collection of more than 300 letters as well as her own insightful introductions, she has created a record of a remarkable friendship and a lyrical homage to the forgotten art of letter writing.